The Juggernaut

Parth Vohra

Parth Vohra loves everything South Asian: the music, the food, the cinema, the literature — everything. Originally from Delhi, he studied political science and journalism at Berkeley. Most of his writing strives to unveil the extraordinary truths of ordinary people.

What’s in a Name?

For many South Asian Americans, choosing baby names is about balancing both South Asian and American heritage.

Ravinder Bhalla, Mayor to All

The Hoboken mayor tells us about his lifelong arc toward politics, why Hoboken matters, and the power of being a visible minority today.

How the Boston Brahmins Persist Today

The elitism of the Boston's upper crust — not to be confused with India’s Brahmins — may have sowed the seeds for the inequality and xenophobia America sees today.

India’s First Female Pilot May Have Inspired a Generation

India is one of the world’s best places for women to fly — 12% of Indian pilots are women, far higher than the global average of 3%. That's due, in part, to Sarla Thakral.

India’s First Female Freedom Fighter

Kittur Rani Chennamma, the ruler of South Indian princely state Kittur, is largely overlooked. Yet Karnataka's “Joan of Arc” beat the British at least once.

“Sacred Games 2” Isn’t What We Hoped For

Sacred Games season two's historical explorations are timely, but they can’t make up for its misogyny or depiction of Muslim characters.

The Rise and Fall of Anand Jon

Jon fell from fame as an acclaimed fashion designer after being outed as a pedophile and rapist. We revisit his case.

The World’s Biggest India Day Parade

With a record number of Indians living in the U.S., Manhattan’s India Day Parade has plenty to celebrate — as well as its fair share of challenges.

Jackson Heights Doesn't Need Amazon to Be Expensive

Amazon may not have come to Queens, but the borough’s once-bustling Jackson Heights is still suffering.

Making Cricket Happen in America

Cricket could have become as popular as baseball, but it didn’t. With $1 billion in funding and a framework to go viral, cricket may soon be the next big thing in the U.S.